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Monday
Dec122011

An Interesting Problem to Have...

On last week's post, I naturally got a comment talking about how this is a blog for unnattractive women:

You can pretty much substitute unattainable/ridiculous beauty standards for "male physical preference." I wonder why hot, slim girls never have this ongoing battle with unattainable beauty standards as the plump and unattractive amongst us do? Maybe because it better serves us and thus are not marginalized and excluded from it.

You're singing the song of the unattractive women.

I would say that I sing the song of "all women" because it would inevitably be a benefit to every single one if some of these trends (and that's what they are) changed. But, that would be doing a disservice to a lot of people who read this blog--many of whom are men--in representing you and people like you.

You equate feminine elevation with more being CEOs and in big managerial positions. This egalitarian feminist stuff is cute and all, but I wonder when you and those like yourself will realize most women simply aren't interested in attaining any of that stuff.

I do? I think peope should do whatever work moves them. I have everything from rocket scientists to stay-at-home moms reading this blog. I myself prefer to be, ironically, a starving artist. And if believing that women are worthwhile as human beings makes me a feminist, so be it, I'm a feminist. 

We simply don't have the same incentives to achieve on that caliber as men do. Why can't people just come to terms with this basic fact of human nature?

Oh, I don't know, Coco, why can't you just read my blog and assimilate the facts: I dropped out of a highly competitive field because i realized it spelt doom for my potential to have a family and actually see them grow up. Figure that one out...I don't have all the answers for you. I do know that while nobody wrote a song called "Looking for Business Partners in All the Wrong Places," you should probably also do womankind a nod and google Sheryl Sandberg.

This just further confirms that much of the impetus behind feminism is based on the dissatisfaction very intelligent women have with the fact that less intelligent, prettier women with few credentials routinely swept the male market without breaking a sweat....While most brilliant and successful women occupy the same trope of generally overly entitled, delusional about what they can attain relationship-wise and their sexual value at large, unattractive, bitter, and may as well start naming their future 28 cats.

This blog is an argument against extremes. You seem to believe that there are only two option: To be intelligent and ugly or an idiot and attractive. The whole point of this blog is that you aren't making binary choices. Your committment to extremism and reductivism alternatively bores me and gives me a migraine.

Ow. It hurts. Make it stop.

And while it's true that I'm objectively less attractive when I have a migraine, I'm simply not an ugly bitch. It would be abusive of me to imply that I haven't used my looks to my advantage on an almost daily basis. I have never gotten a ticket of any kind, I didn't know that oil changes cost money until last year and I routinely get into places I have no business being simply for smiling and asking nicely. But now you're making me sound like a douche and I haven't lived in LA long enough to be a douche. Stop it.

I'm not a douche. I just play one on the internet.

I also believe that it's possible to be a cat lady without ever actually owning any cats. But that's a story for a different day. Let's finish up with you: 

Mind you, I'm a woman who most of my confidence actually comes from my intellect [Ed note: obviously...] as I was a late bloomer, however I'm now good looking and of superior body type. I value my intellect more than I'll ever value my beauty for it is fleeting, but I'm aware of the reality of human biomechanics. I'm aware that I and most women want to get married and make babies. I am aware that men don't give a rat's ass about a woman's professional accolades, academic accolades, and overall intellect unless she's hot. I'm also aware that at the age of 23, given the fact I'm at my prime in attractiveness, it would be foolish and unwise to squander my best years deluding myself that I don't want a man only to complain 10 years later that there are no "good men" who want first dibs of my imminent sexual irrelevancy. 

Life isn't fair, I know. You lot better start learning how to speak cat. 

First of all, how DARE you insult my current ability to speak cat. Second of all, when did this ever become about men wanting me, or anyone who reads this blog. Men-not-wanting-me is not a problem I have but it's also not related to the point of this blog or, more specifically, the post that you commented on. My point is that it would benefit everyone to be aware of--and graduaally change--these standards. And you'd have to be a moron to believe that, as an attractive woman, you are somehow exempt. In a lot of ways, I think beauty standards apply pressure to the most attractive among us even more heavily, since those women are expected to use them to to their advantage effectively and are less free, in some ways, to explore their other talents. 

For me, it's an interesting problem to have: I'm not willing to wrest whatever power from the system and keep my mouth shut while I see things that are offensive simply because I pay for dinner less than the average person. Maybe that, itself, makes me unattractive. Maybe not. But what do I know, I'm just a girl with purple hair, two absentee cats and a lookbook I haven't used in 10 years. 

Meow. 

 

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